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The Syrian Dilemma and the Euclidean Plane

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*NART ABDALKAREEM


 Let us wonder, for example, what if someone believes, while in anger, that what he sees in the mirror is not a reflection of his own image, but another person who wants to do evil things and cause him harm. Here we, or he, has two choices; to either feel afraid and run away or feel more anger and take on the challenge and attack the enemy and retaliate.

This might not help shed light on out dilemma. On the contrary, this might add insult to injury. But, is it not this exactly our case with the international community? Whenever we try to find a solution for this crisis, things get worse. Whenever we fell we are getting close to reach our goal, we discover that we have just got more far away from it. For that, we are now trapped in a bottleneck, with only a few, incomplete explanations. It is either that we, and they as well, are not sincere or honest in our pursuit to reach an end to this situation. It looks like an impossible-to-solve situation. However, may be the solution in somewhere else where we have not looked yet. In this case, it looks like nor matter how hard or how long we try, there will be no solution. It is like the case of two parallel lines that will never meet as long as they exist in the same Euclidean Plane? So, is this really what the case is?

The continuation of the Syrian crises, with all its consequences, wars, extremism, and large-scale migrations achieve the interests of multiple parties at the same time, contrary to what media say. On one hand, arms industry keeps growing in the developed countries, and on the other hand, the flow of migrants will help adjust the balance of population growth in the industrial European countries. Those countries already have low percentage of population growth, e.g. Germany is almost endangered because of low rate of births. What would be the case if the GCC countries, for example, had the same population growth as European Union countries?
 



2016-01-12

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